Resonant Chambers

Boston, Massachusetts

This project views Boston as a city with multiple identities but without a center. Instead of associating with a singular urban context, Resonant Chambers identifies with the neighborhood structure: Fenway, the Back Bay, Beacon Hill, the West End, the North End, Chinatown, the South End, Bay Village, Roxbury, Dorchester, Allston, Brookline, Jamaica Plain... 

Resonant Chambers suggests a new city "center" in Boston by using City Hall as an urban wall to complete and shape a figural public space. It resolves the void surrounding the current city hall as an active public space at the intersection of the core neighborhoods in Boston.

At the scale of the city, the project proposes a linear bar building at the eastern edge of the site to shape a square at the city’s center. The second move, at the scale of the street, fragments the building into a series of vertical “neighborhoods” which correspond with specific programmatic groupings. Courtyards are elevated within the facade between the programmatic “neighborhoods." The final move establishes a linear promenade that connects the courtyards, “neighborhoods”, and square to the city at large.

City Hall Renderings

Boston City Center, 1950, 2000, 2050

Boston City Center, 1950, 2000, 2050

City Hall Site Model, 1"=50', Basswood, Walnut, 3D Print

City Hall Site Model, 1"=50', Basswood, Walnut, 3D Print

City Hall Diagrams: Bar, Context Inflection, View Corridors, Orient to Center, Special Program, Promenade

City Hall Diagrams: Bar, Context Inflection, View Corridors, Orient to Center, Special Program, Promenade

Massing Studies, Various Scales and Materials

Floor Plans

Axonometric. A: Site Walls, B: Faneuil Hall & Subway Entrance Intersection, C: Site Axes, D: Site Confetti, E: Programmatic "Neighborhoods," F: Voids, G: Structure, H: Cores, I: Meeting Rooms, J: Bar, K: Furniture, L: Promenade

Section Model, 1"=25'-0"

Section Model, 1"=25'-0"

 

Yale School of Architecture

Fall 2014

Post-Professional Design Studio with

Professor Edward Mitchell

Critic Aniket Shahane